July 2013

Teen Summer Reading Program, Week 5: Emergency Candles

Emergency CandlesThis week, we're going to do just a little bit to get ready for hurricane season, blizzard season, or whatever issue causes us to lose power!  Hampton teens are invited to come and create their own emergency candle(s).  *We'll be playing with hot, melted wax, so parents be warned.

Who: Teens entering 7th grade and up
What: Emergency Candle Making
When: Wednesday, July 24, 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Where: Lane Memorial Library, Lane Room
Why: Earn a raffle ticket toward winning the Kindle Fire grand prize, just for attending.  Also, remember that if there are more than 5 of you there, you'll get to vote on Kirsten's new hair color: red, orange, or pink!  Only 5 more chances to make your vote count!

Questions?  Ask Kirsten: kcorbett@hampton.lib.nh.us or 926-3368.

Our Books-to-Movies Discussion Series Continues with Alice in Wonderland

Alice in WonderlandJoin us on Wednesday, July 24 for the fourth of our Book-to-Movie screening/discussions.  We'll be watching Alice in Wonderland (rated PG), starring Mia Wasikowska, and then comparing and contrasting it to Lewis Carroll's original book.  Haven't read it yet?  We won't tell!  If you do want to read it, though, you may check out a copy at the front desk.  It's a fun book, and the movie is an interesting and fun adapatation.  Come on in!

Who: Everyone is welcome
What: Alice in Wonderland screening/discussion
When: Wednesday, July 24, 5 p.m.
Where: Lane Memorial Library Weston Theater

Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Lane Memorial Library.

Questions?  Ask Kirsten: kcorbett@hampton.lib.nh.us or 926-3368.

Teen Summer Reading Program, Week 4: Cake Pops!

Cake PopsToday we're going to play with our food!  Hampton teens are invited to come and show off their creativity this afternoon with cake pops.  We'll have melted chocolates to dip them in and all sorts of things to decorate them with.  Haven't tried cake pops yet?  They're fun and easy to make, and even more fun and yummy to eat!

Who: Teens entering 7th grade and up
What: Cake Pops Decorating
When: Wednesday, July 17, 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Where: Lane Memorial Library, Lane Room
Why: Earn a raffle ticket toward winning the Kindle Fire grand prize, just for attending.  Also, remember that if there are more than 5 of you there, you'll get to vote on Kirsten's new hair color: red, orange, or pink!  Only 7 more chances to make your vote count!

Questions?  Ask Kirsten: kcorbett@hampton.lib.nh.us or 926-3368.

Library eyes expansion at old courthouse site

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Hampton officials request use of town-owned land for future project

By Nick B. Reid

Hampton Union, July 5, 2013

[The following article is courtesy of the Hampton Union and Seacoast Online.]

 HAMPTON — It's no secret that the Lane Memorial Library has been eyeing the newly vacated parcel of land across the street where the old courthouse used to stand for an expansion. But selectmen, who addressed the issue Monday night, are treading cautiously for the time being.

The library doesn't need more space for books that badly, but its meeting space isn't cutting it, according to Library Director Amanda Reynolds Cooper.

"In 2012 we had 787 events in this one crummy little space that is our actual meeting room," she said. "What we really need is space to be able to offer that to the public."

That's why she's partnering with Recreation Director Dyana Martin in her idea for the expansion to offer a quality meeting space that could be used for both the library and the recreation department.

"We could easily share a space because any function room, you leave it blank and then you could make it whatever you need it to be," she said. "She could do yoga classes and then I could have an author talk."

Reynolds Cooper also hopes that she'd be able to move the children's room in the library, which is currently two-thirds underground, to a newer, brighter space.

In order to do that, the town would have to give the portion of the parcel of land where the courthouse stood to the library.

"In a perfect world, the children's room would be on a floor with windows and light and nice air circulation," she said.

The prevailing discussion as to how the library might expand would include building where Academy Avenue currently is, with the road then being re-routed around the expansion. Selectmen Chairman Dick Nichols said the police and fire chiefs were against an earlier thought to close off that end of Academy Avenue so the library could freely expand over the road as well.

Selectman Mike Pierce, the first to address the proposal in which library trustees sent a formal letter discussing their idea to the selectmen, said there were more factors to consider before the board makes any decision on the future of that land.

"We've got some vacant area there. On the grand scheme in my mind before we get to the library we've got to think about (Hampton) Academy and what they're going to do because they've got some issues there," he said, referring to plans to upgrade the aging middle school.

Pierce said, according to the state Department of Education, "they need more land than they have, probably by some significant amount," based on the number of students at the school.

Selectman Mike Plouffe agreed that selectmen should "look into it," but not "rush into it."

Plouffe said "property is an issue" for Hampton Academy.

"If they decide they're not going to keep that building and do a new school on the land they have off Exeter Road, then some of these other proposals would perhaps be better, but until they kind of make a determination ...; I think we ought to consider their needs," he said.

Selectman Mary-Louise Woolsey agreed, saying, "I think this is way premature."

Reynolds Cooper said she's planning on reaching out to SAU 90 Superintendant Kathleen Murphy to better understand the district's plans for Hampton Academy, based on the selectmen's feedback.

Fred Welch said in this case, the town would be transferring land outside its jurisdiction to give it to the library, and that move would be done at Town Meeting, as would the appropriation of the money to build the addition.

"Once land is given to the library, it's theirs as long as the library exists or until such time as they surrender the property back. So you are, in fact, for all intents and purposes, without a deed, actually deeding the right to use the property forever," he said.

Nichols said parks and recreation, which also has an interest in benefiting from the expanded space, has a number of other priorities that have come up in recent years, including the Campbell Ball Fields project, as well as a community center. He said his first reaction is that "all of those things are not going to get done in the near-term future," and he wondered what the top priority was.

In addition, he worried about all the other costs the town is dealing with.

"I think we're quite a ways — maybe a year or two, best case — from having our arms around the DPW infrastructure-type issues: roads, sewers, storm water, wastewater treatment plant and so on and so forth. I'm not in favor of major investments in other areas until we really know where we stand with that end of things," Nichols said.

Reynolds Cooper said even if the library had to wait several years for the land, it's difficult for its staff to plan without knowing what's coming.

"Say this addition is three, five, eight, 10 years out, there's no way that we can plan without knowing that we have some expectation that we can have that land. Really that's the first thing we're looking for is just that notion that if we engage an architect and start drawing up plans and have focus groups and all those things, we can anticipate that we can actually build on that land when it gets to that point," she said.

Cooper also insisted the plot is the only place the library could ever expand.

"The schools do have other land options; the library does not," she said. "There's nothing to any other cardinal point around our building other than this space. If we can't be expected to build on it at some point, the library will not get any bigger."

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"Remembrance: the Pink Chair Project" with July artist Lynn Schulte

"Daisy Love"Lynn Schulte will be exhibiting her travelling art show Remembrance: the Pink Chair Project in the Lane Library Weston Gallery during the month of July, 2013.  The group of paintings make up a love story that celebrates the memory of Lynne’s mother in moving and beautiful images. Lynne sensed her mother’s presence while painting an Adirondack chair of her mother’s favorite color – bright, knock-your-socks-off pink. After the initial surprise of that experience, Lynne began placing the chair into various locations that had special meaning to herself or her mother. In this way, she created a cohesive body of work that shines as individual paintings as well as a sensitive and powerful grouping.

Each painting has a story. As she painted, Lynne understood more about her mother, about her relationship with her mother, and herself. These stories are written and posted with the paintings. “In grieving and learning to accept that my mother is gone, I am celebrating that she has been released,” said Schulte. “As hard as it is not to have her here with me, there is an understanding that comes.”

People are invited to participate in the project by posting a note to a loved one, or by writing a longer excerpt in the Remembrance book available in the Weston Gallery.  Lynn maintains a blog about the Pink Chair Project at http://pinkchairpaintings.blogspot.com.

Those who want to learn more about Lynn and the story of this exhibit are welcome to attend an Artist Reception and Presentation on Monday, July 29th at 6:30 PM.  The library will supply light refreshments.

You can read more about Lynne and her exhibit here.

RemembranceSailing HomeView over Camden Maine

Selectmen: Library Addition Would Be 'Premature'

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By Kyle Stucker

Hampton-North Hampton Patch , July 2, 2013

[The following article is courtesy of Hampton-NorthHampton.patch.com

A bulldozer works to clear out remains of the old Hampton District Court building. Lane Memorial Library can be seen across Academy Avenue in the background of the image.
A bulldozer works to clear out remains of the old Hampton
District Court building. Lane Memorial Library can be seen
across Academy Avenue in the background of the image.

If Lane Memorial Library is going to receive an addition in the near future, it won’t be in 2014, as selectmen have put a hold on the idea in order to focus on more pressing, higher-priority land needs.

Library officials appeared in front of the Hampton Board of Selectmen Monday night to request that the board allow them to pursue engineering plans with an understanding or agreement that they could use the land freed by the demolition of the old Hampton District Court building.

Selectmen said Hampton Academy, located behind the site of the former courthouse, has greater space issues that they feel should be solved or fully explored first, even though the library is seeking an addition that would also benefit the Hampton Recreation Department and give the town a community center.

"On the grand scheme in my mind, we've got to think about the Academy and what they're going to do," said Selectman Mike Pierce, stating that the town should also "look at the roads, sewers and drains" before beginning a non-essential project like a library addition. "I think if we're going to use that parcel of land for some purpose other than for letting the trees grow... I think we ought to consider their activities first."

Selectmen Dick Nichols and Mary-Louise Woolsey both called the library's request "premature," with the former also stating that there are too many uncertainties and unknowns in the budgeting of the capital improvement plan, particularly in the Hampton Public Works Department, to begin work on another building project.

Newly-appointed Selectman Mike Plouffe said the idea is one the town "ought to look into" — but not "rush into it."

Selectman Phil Bean said the idea, which is conceptual and doesn't yet have concrete features or ideas, is "interesting" and said he's "interested in hearing more" because of the possibility of being able to incorporate multiple town functions into the space.


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Court's Demolition Opens Door for Library Addition/Community Center?

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By Kyle Stucker

Hampton-North Hampton Patch , July 1, 2013

[The following article is courtesy of Hampton-NorthHampton.patch.com

Lane Memorial Library is hoping to get the green light from town officials to formally begin the process of drafting plans for an addition that could satisfy Hampton's long-sought demands for a community center.

Library officials are expected to discuss with the Hampton Board of Selectmen on Monday a proposal for a new building at the site of the old Hampton District Court building, which was torn down recently. Library Director Amanda Reynolds Cooper said library staff have been asked numerous times about the possibility of an addition since the courthouse's razing, and Cooper said "the verbal support of the idea" led the library to believe that they should "get started sooner rather than later" on investigating an addition — an idea she said they've had since the last addition was made in 1985.

Ideas for the space are preliminary and design plans don't yet exist, although Cooper said the addition would either be built upon the courthouse lot and connected to the current 1910 library by an air bridge-style tunnel over Academy Avenue, or be built onto the existing building after Academy Avenue is rerouted around the site of the proposed addition.

A new structure would allow the library to expand its space for its Children's Room and its Senior Citizen Drop-In Center — both of which are currently located in the basement. Cooper said it would also give the library and the Hampton Recreation Department more than just one room for events and community-focused functions.

"The [current] room is flexible in what can be done with light [and] moveable furniture but we regularly turn people away because it is booked during the evening and weekend hours they would like," said Cooper in an e-mail, adding that in 2012 the library hosted 475 events in the building, 308 of which were run by the library and 167 of which were run by community members.

"Hampton has very little community space. We love being the place that people come to have Town Clock Committee meetings, Republican and Democrat Committee meetings, sell tickets for PTA sponsored events, and various health concern support groups. We’d like to be able to host more community events such as the Boys and Girls Scouts monthly meetings and really dislike turning people away along with the answer that there really isn’t anywhere else in Town from them to go. This addition would be a welcome space for people to meet for serious and recreational events."

Funding for the addition and the engineering work to formalize the plan would likely be secured through a fundraising campaign as well as through one or more town meeting warrant articles, according to Cooper.


 

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