Hampton's Old District Schools -- Part 4

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Photographs & Captions

Part 4

Drake Side District School House
The Drake Side District School House as it looked in 1920, was situated at the junction of Drakeside Road and Towle Farm Road. The school house burned to the ground July 3, 1930 as a Fourth of July prank by unknown pranksters. Today this location would be roughly in the middle of Route 95.
The "Blakeville School"
The North School (or "North Primary" or "Blakeville School"), as it looked in 1921. Miss Etta Colby Blake taught here for 15 years. After it was closed in May 1922, when the new Centre School opened, it was moved to Dearborn Avenue, and is the second story at 44-46 Dearborn Avenue.
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 1
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 1
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 1: Left to right: Wilson Hamilton, Leonard Blake, Ustina Carlson (Simonds), Edgar Locke and Wayne Higgins.
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 2
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 2
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 2: Left to right: Verne Higgins, Doris Remick, Frank Newton and Leon Mace.
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 3
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 3
1921 North School Pupils in Grade 3: Back row, left to right: Lee Hamilton, Herman Remick, Kirby Higgins, Harold Towle, Paul Tobey and Frank Remick.
Front row: Constance Adams (Billings), Alvena Thayer and Margaret Tobey (Barry).
1921 North School Pupils
1921 North School Pupils
1921 North School Pupils: Back row, left to right: Herman Remick, Kirby Higgins, Alvena Thayer, Margaret Tobey (Barry), Harold Towle, Paul Tobey and Frank Remick.
Middle row: Wilson Hamilton, Ustina Carlson (Simonds), Doris Remick, Wayne Higgins, Leon Mace and Lee Hamilton.
Front row: Constance Adams (Billings), Verne Higgins, Edgar Locke, Frank Newton and Leonard Blake.
Teacher: Anna Chase (Eastman) of Seabrook.
The Grammar School

This picture post card, at right, taken around 1916 shows the Center Grammar School built in 1873 at a cost of $4,485., comprised of 2 stories, each story had ceilings of 11 feet in height. The building, 47 feet by 32 feet, was originally on the site of the Hampton Centre School on Winnacunnet Road, but when the Centre School was built in 1921-22, it was moved to the corner of Winnacunnet Road and Academy Avenue, and served at one time or another as Hampton's first kindergarten, American Legion Post #35 hall, Fire Station #2 from 1932, until the new station was built, and more recently the Hampton District Court House.

The 'East End' School House
The "East End" School House, 1873 - 1922
The East End School House was also built in 1873, a wooden building, 46 feet by 32 feet, with 12 feet high ceilings in the lower story and 10 feet ceilings in the upper story, and was built at a cost of $5,358.70. A marker indicates the spot where it once stood at the junction of Locke Road and Winnacunnet Road. Prior to its being demolished in July of 1940 after being auctioned off for $120, it had been a Tea Room, serving a blue plate dinner for $1.; English tea was served from 3 to 5 p.m.. A business card in the Tuck Museum shows that there was parking grounds and dance hall for guests. It was operated by Eva E. Mason, and was called "EAST END SCHOOL HOUSE LUNCH". It was not used for a school after 1922, when the Centre School opened its doors.



'One-Room School House'
The One-Room District School House
The One-Room District School House on Meeting House Green, adjacent to the Tuck Museum at 40 Park Avenue, was built in 1855 and moved to the "Green" in 1951 from its original location on "Fore Road" (sometimes called "Portsmouth Road", now Lafayette Road, at the rear of 893 Lafayette Road). It is now fully restored and contains school furnishings and desks from the early school days in Hampton. It is opened during the summer months.

In 1873, while the new Grammar school was being built, school was held in the Hampton Town Hall, which at that time, had ceased to be a church. The unpainted square box pews around the room were still there and the tall pulpit was lying on its side in the Town Hall wood room! The original pulpit of the Congregational Church is now in place in the Sanctuary of the church. The Town Hall burned in March of 1949 from a faulty furnace, and was never rebuilt. The original Town Hall sign was salvaged from the Town Dump by Marshall S. Holman and is now on display in the Tuck Museum.




The new Centre School which opened in 1922

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