At the library

A Sad Tale from Hampton of Old


You can find some very interesting stories in the local papers of the 19th century. This one comes from the Exeter News-Letter of 1892. If you're an animal lover you might not want to read this story, as it has a very sad ending. It's not a story you'd be likely to see in today's paper, as I think the situation would have been handled very differently. Sometimes things do change for the better.

The Exeter News-Letter, September 23, 1892

Hampton, September 2. -- A mad dog scare on Sunday afternoon, probably was not a case of hydrophobia. Some ladies making a neighboring call, left a baby carriage at the door and on starting for home found a strange dog under it so furious that they dared not take the carriage, and several men were unable to drive him away. They sent for Police Officer Curtis DeLancey, who was attacked by the dog and obliged to defend himself by shooting with a small revolver. The maddened brute then rushed at a student of Exeter Academy and was driven back wounded by a fine shot from a fowling piece. After a chase of a mile or two through woods and fields the dog was shut up under a small building and may bleed to death.

The Exeter News-Letter, September 30, 1892

Hampton, September 26. -- The story of the savage dog as told last week by your correspondent "Star" occasioned general astonishment. Let us tell the story "as others see it." We have here a young dog, whose only fault is that he does not always wish to stay at home. One Sunday he goes to church with his master, who leaves him in the horse shed. Pretty soon Mr. Dog gets tired of his quarters and concludes to take a stroll. He has gone only a short distance when he spies a baby carriage, which looks exactly like the one used by his mistress. Thinking he has a clear duty to perform he lies down by the carriage to guard it. Next come the real owners with the baby. They call in several men, to drive the dog away. The men stood in the distance and threw sticks and stones at the dog. Had the dog been shown his error he would have gone away peaceably, but as he thought it his duty to stay he had no notion of leaving. Then comes the policeman, armed with revolver and shot gun. They stand at a distance from the "maddened brute," lying quietly beside the carriage and began to shoot. His owner was obliged next morning to have him killed.

Useful websites for New Hampshire voters

A recent question posed at our Reference Desk had me digging around trying to find good websites where voters could go to learn more about the candidates in the upcoming elections. After doing some googling and querying some fellow librarians I came up with a list of eight sites that are full of good information for voters.

votesmart.org
Project Vote Smart is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the United States. It covers candidates and elected officials in six basic areas: background information, issue positions (via the Political Courage Test), voting records, campaign finances, interest group ratings, and speeches and public statements.

ballotpedia.org
Ballotpedia is a fact-checked wiki-style online encyclopedia about American politics and elections. It covers U.S. Congress, state executive officials, state legislatures, recall elections, state and local ballot measures, and school board elections. The Wall Street Journal described Ballotpedia as "a nonpartisan organization that collects election data."

livefreeordiealliance.org
The Live Free or Die Alliance is a nonpartisan, 501(c)3 nonprofit organization created to serve New Hampshire citizens by: providing objective information about issues and candidates, promoting the civil exchange of opinions in a variety of forums, online and in person, and connecting citizens with their elected officials.

ontheissues.org
OnTheIssues is an American non-partisan, non-profit organization providing information to voters about candidates, primarily via their web site. The organization was started in 1996, went non-profit in 2000, and is currently run primarily by volunteers. The organization's stated mission is to help voters pick candidates "based on issues rather than on personalities and popularity." They obtain their information from newspapers, speeches, press releases, book excerpts, House and Senate voting records, Congressional bill sponsorships, political affiliations and ratings, and campaign websites from the Internet.

nhpr.org
New Hampshire Public Radio has a great deal of information on the 2014 elections on this site. If you are following this link after the election go to the NHPR.org home page and click on the News menu to find any upcoming election information that might be available.

politifact.com
PolitiFact.com is a project operated by the Tampa Bay Times, in which reporters and editors from the Times and affiliated media outlets "fact-check statements by members of Congress, the White House, lobbyists and interest groups". They publish original statements and their evaluations on the PolitiFact.com website, and assign each a "Truth-O-Meter" rating. The ratings range from "True" for completely accurate statements to "Pants on Fire" (from the taunt "Liar, liar, pants on fire") for false and ridiculous claims. This link points to the New Hampshire section of their website.

wmur.com
WMUR, New Hampshire's largest television station, has good coverage of local, state and national elections in New Hampshire.

opencongress.org
OpenCongress is a comprehensive, nonpartisan source for what's happening in the United States Congress. Their website makes it easy to follow legislation in Congress, from bill introduction to floor vote, as well as profiles for senators and representatives. You can use the site to learn more about issues you care about and connect with others who share similar views.

The Most Frequently Read Novels of 2013

If you are looking for a good read, try one of the 25 novels below. According to the library's circulation statistics these are the most popular novels that our patrons read last year. Best of all you probably won't have to go on a long waiting list to read them. Many are probably just sitting on the shelf waiting for you to grab them. There's a pretty wide variety here, too. Something for most peoples' tastes. And, of course, the obligatory five titles by James Patterson. His frequency on the best-seller lists is why one of the squares on our adult Summer Reading bingo cards reads "Any Novel Not by James Patterson." Have you started filling out your bingo card yet? Fill out one raffle ticket for each square of the bingo cards you fill and you will be entered into weekly drawings and the final grand prize drawing on September 1st.

The top 25, in order of popularity:

  1. Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn.
  2. Inferno, by Dan Brown.
  3. The Burgess Boys, by Elizabeth Strout.
  4. And the Mountains Echoed, by Khaled Hosseini.
  5. Second Honeymoon, by James Patterson.
  6. The Light Between Oceans, by M.L. Stedman.
  7. Collateral Damage, by Stuart Woods.
  8. Silken Prey, by John Sandford.
  9. The Storyteller, by Jodi Picoult.
  10. Whiskey Beach, by Nora Roberts.
  11. 11th Hour, by James Patterson.
  12. Defending Jacob, by William Landay.
  13. The Art Forger, by Barbara Shapiro.
  14. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James.
  15. Unintended Consequences, by Stuart Woods.
  16. 12th of Never, by James Patterson.
  17. Breaking Point, by C.J. Box.
  18. Daddy's Gone a Hunting, by Mary Higgins Clark.
  19. Private London, by James Patterson.
  20. The Racketeer, by John Grisham.
  21. The Hit, by David Baldacci.
  22. Robert B. Parker's Wonderland, by Ace Atkins.
  23. The Innocent, by David Baldacci.
  24. The Boss of Hampton Beach, by Jed Power.
  25. Private Berlin, by James Patterson.

Letters from Wingfield Farm

Letter from Wingfield FarmAsk any Canadian "Who is Walt Wingfield?", and you will likely be met with a delighted smile of recognition.  Comic actor Rod Beattie has been bringing the iconic character of stockbroker-turned-farmer to life on stages throughout Canada for the past 20 years.  Now these performances have been collected on six DVDs, and are available for checkout at the Lane Library.  Featuring Beattie's remarkable impersonation of over a dozen characters from Larkspur in the Persephone Township, each of these single-actor plays shines with a humor reminiscent of Will Rogers and the best of Garrison Keillor.

In describing the first play, "Letters from Wingfield Farm",  theater critic Connie Meng says  "Mr. Beattie is able to change characters in the blink of an eye.  Using only a few hats, an amazingly flexible voice and terrific body language, he plays Walt's stammering neighbor Freddie, the old Squire across the road, the newspaper owner, a maudlin Irishman, a confused old lady and a preoccupied mechanic.  By the end of the evening we feel that we know these residents of Persephone Township.

Using the format of Walt's letters to the editor of the weekly newspaper, playwright Needles ties together various anecdotes about Walt's attempts to return to a simpler life.  Among them are trying to plow with his horse that only turns to the left, his misguided attempt to milk a heifer, and his anxiety about an ailing duck.  There are a couple of touching moments, but Mr. Beattie's timing is perfect and he never allows the material to become maudlin."

Lane Library patrons may reserve any one of these DVDs by following the links below in our on-line catalog.

Letter from Wingfield Farm

Wingfield's Folly

Wingfield's Progress

Wingfield on Ice

Wingfield's Inferno

Wingfield Unbound

Build or Expand Your Business, or Find a Job, with Reference USA

Reference USA logoAre you planning to start a business? Are you already a business owner but are looking for new markets into which to expand? Do you want to find out what the competition is up to? Reference USA is a database of information about American businesses. It provides in-depth data about businesses, including business names, addresses, zip codes, the number of employees, annual revenue, the names of managers or owners, business expenditures, nearby businesses, and more. You can limit results to businesses in your zip code, by company size, or other criteria. You can search using a number of different criteria, and either print your results or save them to a flash drive to study later.

Some introductory video tutorials are available on the Reference USA website, and they also have a series of webinars that anyone can sign up and take.

The two sections of Reference USA that hold business information are:

U.S. Businesses

This database of over 24 million U.S. businesses contains verified, accurate data and is updated monthly and enhanced with more than 20 million phone calls per year. Selection criteria include: company name, executive title, business type, sales volume, employee size, year established, and more.

U.S. New Businesses

Updated with more than 50,000 new businesses added each week. Use to research hot areas of economic development. These new businesses need a wide variety of goods and services. Selection criteria include: company name, contact information, business location type, business filing type.

More than Business data


Reference USA also has two more features, one a site to help job-seekers and another a standard white pages phone directory.

U.S. Jobs and Internships

Combines the power of Reference USA's business listings with the job site indeed.com. Find your next job with a state-of-the-art mapping tool and view results with detailed business profiles. Selection criteria include: job title, company name, business type, multiple geography options, and more.

U.S. Standard White Pages

Use this database of over 89 million U.S. residents to conduct market research, and locate friends and relatives. These records are continuously updated and processed against the USPS National Change of Address (NCOA) and Delivery Sequence File (DSF). Selection criteria include: name, address, telephone, median home value, median home income, and more.

Begin using Reference USA by clicking here or the image above

iPod Nanos with New and Notable Titles for Teens

 

 

Nanos

The Teen Services Department is excited to offer a new way for Teens to listen to great audio books. We've added three Nanos to our Teen Audio Collection with a variety of titles. You can check out our new Nanos at the front desk.


ScowlerVibesguysreadhalf badfault in our stars book cover

 

 

COMPLETE LIST OF CURRENT TITLES

William Shakespeare's Star Wars by Ian Doescher

Scowler by Daniel Kraus

Zombie Baseball Beatdown by Paolo Bacigalupi  

Etiquette and espionage by Gail Carriger  

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell  

Crap Kingdom by D.C. Pierson 

Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black  

Flat-out Love by Jessica Park  

Half Bad by Sally Green  

Divergent by Veronica Roth  

Insurgent by Veronica Roth  

Allegiant by Veronica Roth  

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson  

Maze Runner by James Dasher  

Scorch Trials by James Dasher 

Death Cure by James Dasher 

Spy Cat by Peg Kehret 

Stranger Next Door by Peg Kehret 

Grave Mercy by Robin Lafevers

Dark Triumph by Robin Lafevers

Lemonade War by Jacqueline Davies

Crooked Kind of Perfect by Linda Urban

Infinity by Sherrily Kenyon47 by Walter Mosely

Vibes by Amy Kathleen Ryan  

Dead Girls Don't Lie by Jennifer Shaw Wolf

Perry's Killer Playlist by Joe Schreiber  

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carol  

Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens  

Fault In Our Stars by John Green  

Guys Read: a day in the life by Shaun Tan 

Guys Read: bouncing the grinning goat by Shannon Hale  

Guys Read: rise of the RoboShoes by Tom Angleberger  

Heroes, Gods, and Monsters of the Greek Myths by Bernard Evslin  

Juliet Club by Suzanne Harper  

Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving  

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle  

Snow queen by Hans Christian Andersen  

Stranger Next Door (Pete the Cat) by Peg Kehret  

Team Human by Sarah Rees Bren  

This Star Won't Go Out: The Life and Words of Esther Grace Earl by Esther Earl

Vibes by Amy Kathleen Ryan  

White Fang by Jack London  

1984 by George Orwell.

A great idea for a New Year's Resolution

New Year's ResolutionsIt's that time of year - time to make that New Year's Resolution again. You know the one. It's the same one you've made - and broken - countless times before. But this year will be different, right? You're going to stick to that diet / quit those ciggies / keep going to the gym / [insert your Resolution here] this year unlike past years where you lasted about, what, a week or two? On a good year? Well I say forget putting yourself through that torture this year. I've got a much better idea. Resolve, in 2014, to use your public library more often! What's not to like about that? There is no deprivation involved. In fact, you'll enrich your life considerably. It won't cost you a lot of money. In fact, it could save you a bundle. For a lot of people their public library has never been a big part of their lives. Maybe you are one of them. So make 2014 the year you change that. Learn about all of the services we offer. Learn how you can save money by taking advantage of your tax dollars at work.

If you are a reader, are you the type who buys just about every book you ever read? Sure it's more convenient but is it really worth the cost? We have more books on our shelves than you can possibly ever read, even if you only count the ones likely to be of interest to you. Trust me, as someone whose reading list only grows longer, never shorter, all of your reading needs can easily be supplied by the library. And if we don't have a title you want, just request it from us and we'll do our best to get it for you. Do you read mostly best-sellers and purchase them because you hate waiting lists? Try being proactive and putting holds on upcoming bestsellers so you get them more quickly. You can logon to your account online to place holds, and you can find out what we have on order by checking this link to our catalog or subscribing to our weekly "Wowbrary" newsletter.

Have you given up on paper books and only read ebooks now? The library is part of a statewide consortium subscription to the Overdrive service which offers thousands of ebooks (and audiobooks) for free download. You have complete access. All you need is a library card. All of the ebook titles are in our online catalog. Just search for the term 'Overdrive' in our catalog and you'll find them all. Click the "Get it" link and you'll be brought straight to the Overdrive site where you can log in and get the title you want (or place a hold on it.) Did you just get an e-reader or tablet computer for Christmas and need help figuring out how to download Overdrive titles to it? We're here to answer your questions.

Are you more of a magazine and newspaper kind of reader? We have all the local papers, and some of the bigger national ones like USA Today, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Investor's Business Daily. You'll have to come into the library to read them of course, but we're a comfy spot that is warm in winter, cool in summer, and very friendly too! There's a great social benefit to reading in the library as well. You'll get to bump into friends, neighbors and strangers who aren't yet friends. As for magazines, the library subscribes to close to 200, and you can see a list here. You can also visit the online newsstand to read a selection of popular magazines online, or use our Ebscohost service to search several thousand magazine titles, many available in full text.

What? You're not much of a reader? Aside from suggesting that doing more reading would also be a good New Year's Resolution, I want to remind you that we have a lot more than books, magazines and newspapers here. We have a large collection of new and old DVD and Blu-ray movies, including most of the big new releases. Even more popular than the movies sometimes are the TV series sets we carry on DVD. Whether it's Breaking Bad, Downton Abbey, Homeland, Dexter, Sons of Anarchy, Duck Dynasty and many more, you'll find plenty to keep you busy. And as with books, if there is a movie or TV series we don't have that you'd like to see, just put in a request and we'll see what we can do.

Are you struggling at home with a cranky computer or printer, or perhaps having trouble affording your high-speed Internet access? We have 17 Internet stations here with high-speed access and good laser printers, both color and black and white. We'll charge you for the printouts, but use of the computers is free. We also have wireless access throughout the building (and even in the parking lot) that many people use with their own laptops because they don't have an Internet connection at home.

Let's not forget the children! Our Children's Room has thousands of books, magazines, movies, music, puzzles and puppets for you to choose from, as well as very popular programs and activities throughout the year. If you are a parent don't deny your child the wonder of regular visits to the library. And while you are in our Children's Room check out the Parent Shelf for some good parent-oriented reading.

There are a number of other services that many people are unaware of. We have passes and discounts to many local museums that can be checked out. You can take a wide varity of free online classes through Universal Class. You just need a library card to sign up. That same card will give you access to the Morningstar Investment Research Center, which offers comprehensive investment advice and tools to grow your portfolio. Transparent Language Online will help you learn to speak and read about 80 different languages. Genealogists will want to check out our subscription to HeritageQuest, Ancestry.com and the databases of the New England Historic Genealogical Society in Boston. (The latter two can only be accessed from library computers.)

In closing, I want to let those of you who do plan on pursuing a more 'traditional' New Year's Resolution, that we do have resources here at the library to help you lose weight or eat right or exercise more or write your will or whatever it is that you want to do. Start your new year off on the right foot by (re)visiting your public library to find out all that we have to offer.

See you in the library!

Farewell to the Hampton Beach Firehouse (photos)

Hampton Beach Firehouse 1928Hampton Beach Firehouse - 2013

On August 13, 1936, the Hampton Union ran a story in the Souvenir Edition about the history of the Hampton Beach Fire Department.  It read in part, "... In 1922, the first fire house was built also under the direction of Chief A. H. Brown. In the same year, an Aherns-Fox pump and ladder combination was put into use making two motor driven fire engines.  In 1923, the fire house was burned down. Immediately, the work was started to rebuild a fire station of modern design and soon there was a 2-story stone structure of a cement base and has a capacity of housing 5 modern fire trucks with a 3 door run. It was rebuilt on the site of the first fire house on Marsh (Ashworth) Ave. where it still stands."

This year the new Hampton Beach firehouse was completed, marking the end of nearly a century of life for this grand old building.  To mark its passing, staff from the Lane Library was allowed inside just prior to demolition in order to take some photographs.  These shots are now available for viewing on our Flickr site.  Included are images of the various rooms and bays, plus a few close-ups of the old fixtures and some bits and pieces of daily life.  We also have a web page dedicated to the Hampton Fire Department, with many linked articles for those who would like to delve deeper into both the history of the Fire Department and some of the more notable fires from the past.

Bays 1 and 2Precinct meeting roomMedical care

You've never read anything like "The October List"

The October List book jacketI'll bet you've never read a book like Jeffery Deaver's newest. The adjective "clever" comes to mind. "The October List" is a novel of suspense written in a most unusual style. Like the movie "Memento" (which we have on DVD and is worth a watch), this book starts at the end of the story and moves backward in time, leaping to earlier points in the main characters' lives. After reading the first chapter the story appears to end in a huge cliffhanger, but by the time you finish the book I guarantee you'll figure it all out. Although if you're like me, this won't happen without having to go back and reread some chapters a few times as further clues to the puzzle that is this story are revealed. This is one book I wouldn't want to listen to in its audio version. It would be too difficult to go back and re-listen to some sections!

To see if this book is available or to place a hold, find the record in our online catalog.

Thirty years ago today

September 26, 1983 - September 26, 2013

The date September 26th has been stuck in my brain for 30 years. It has now been that long since the construction of our current library building began. At that time the library was housed in a much smaller building that included our original 1910 structure (which still forms the front of the library) and a 1957 addition that needed to be torn down. That obviously meant that we had to move the library during the entire construction period, which lasted a year and a half. We moved to a very small space in the back of Stickney Terrace, past where the Post Office is now, and also had a rented trailer out in the parking lot. To accomplish the move I came up with the 'bright' idea of asking our library patrons to check out as many books as possible and return them to the new library. It worked like a charm, and over the course of a few weeks the people of Hampton, and even neighboring libraries, checked out half of our collection. The problem with this idea was that when they were returned they all had to be reshelved! And they were not in any kind of order, as they would have been had we just removed them in order from their shelves and moved them that way.

So what is the significance of September 26th? We used orange date due index cards in those days, and that date was stamped on the cards in every one of the books that we checked out for the move. So as you can probably imagine, September 26th was a busy day for the library staff! We not only had to deal with setting up in a new location, we now had literally thousands of books that had to be reshelved. Our book drop was overflowing. One fun fact - the first book put in our book drop in our new location was Charles Dickens' "Bleak House," which pretty aptly described our new quarters. When we moved into our wonderful new building in the Spring of 1985 we were excited to find out what would be the first book put into our new book drop. Well, as the only male on the library staff at the time, I was less-then-thrilled that it was a book titled "Superior women."

The library on moving day, 1983The inside of the old library on moving day, September 6, 1983. Here
Joan Kahl is standing behind our circulation desk after all the remaining books
had been packed into boxes. We made several trips to the liquor
store to get all these boxes, and library patrons brought us many more.

Groundbreaking ceremonies
Groundbreaking ceremonies, September 23, 1983. The tall gentleman with the
hat standing in back is Wheaton Lane, last surviving male member of
the branch of the Lane family after whom the library is named.

Demolition day
Demolition day for the old 1957 addition, October 3, 1983. For these photos and
many more showing the construction phase of the library, browse the photos here.

The library in temporary quarters
A view of the inside of our temporary quarters on Stickney Terrace in the winter of 1984.

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